anhonestlie

In Uncategorized on August 21, 2013 at 10:50 am

 

 

 

 

 

 

THORN IN YOUR FOOT?

 

 

 

 

 

Image

 

(My, I feel just like the poor fellow in the picture above.)

 

You may, or may not have heard that Open Heart Publishing, and An Honest Lie, are now on a company-wide production hold. This means that due to circumstances beyond our control, all printing has been halted. Unfortunately, this means there will be no more freshly printed books to buy until the production hold is removed.

 

Aaaaaaaaaaaaahh!

 

So, what are we going to do in the meantime?

 

Keeping busy, believe it or not!

 

Book copies … Many of you have contacted me looking for book copies. Sadly, all the extra copies I have are one copy of V2. It’s available for anyone who wants it. As far as finding other copies that may be available to buy, I can only suggest that if you are looking for copies, contact me at sredohp@yahoo.com and let me know which volumes you are seeking. Adversely, if you have any spare volumes you’d be interested in selling, contact me at sredohp@yahoo.com and I’ll put the word out for you. (Please note, all transactions are strictly between seller and buyer. I will not accept or forward money, or books. My job is simply to match buyer and seller and put them in contact with each other.)

 

 

Speaking of interviews, we still have them and they are still available for your review! You’ll find them at this blog, http://anhonestliespeaks.blogspot.com. Just scroll down until you find your interview!

 

Don’t forget, you are always welcome to contact me via email at sredohp@yahoo.com, should you have any questions about the material you are working on, marketing, writing advice, comments on posts, or any problems, etc.

 

 

 

* * *

 

 

(My, I feel just like the poor fellow in the picture above.)

 

 

You may, or may not have heard that Open Heart Publishing, and An Honest Lie, are now on a company-wide production hold. This means that due to circumstances beyond our control, all printing has been halted. Unfortunately, this means there will be no more books to buy until the production hold is removed.

 

Aaaaaaaaaaaaahh!

 

So, what are we going to do in the meantime?

 

Keeping busy, believe it or not!

 

Book copies … Many of you have contacted me looking for book copies. Sadly, all the extra copies I have are one copy of V2. It’s available for anyone who wants it. As far as finding other copies that may be available to buy, I can only suggest that if you are looking for copies, contact me at sredohp@yahoo.com and let me know which volumes you are seeking. Adversely, if you have any spare volumes you’d be interested in selling, contact me at sredohp@yahoo.com and I’ll put the word out for you. (Please note, all transactions are strictly between seller and buyer. I will not accept or forward money, or books. My job is simply to match buyer and seller and put them in contact with each other.)

 

 

Speaking of interviews, we still have them and they are still available for your review! You’ll find them at this blog, http://anhonestliespeaks.blogspot.com. Just scroll down until you find your interview!

 

Don’t forget, you are always welcome to contact me via email at sredohp@yahoo.com, should you have any questions about the material you are working on, marketing, writing advice, comments on posts, or any problems, etc.

 

 

 

* * *

 

 

 

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Please say Hello to returning author PATRICK SCALISI!

In Uncategorized on December 13, 2012 at 1:47 pm

Please welcome returning author PATRICK SCALISI! He brings us “Salvage”, to be published in Open Heart Publishing’s anthology An Honest Lie Vol. 4: Petulant Parables.



ET: Patrick, this is not your first story. Can you tell us about your other publications?

PS: I’ve been publishing professionally since 2008 and have been lucky enough to have my work appear in multiple web and print sources. I’m glad to be back working with Open Heart Publishing, which printed my story “The Registry of Lost Socks” in An Honest Lie Vol. 2. Apart from that, I’ve also been working a lot with another independent publisher called Post Mortem Press. PMP published my ghost story “Carousel Gardens” in two of their anthologies and was gracious enough to ask me to guest edit a forthcoming anthology about haunted machines.

ET: Editing is a great way to get your name out, and to hone your craft. What about other engagements, such as public speaking and book signings?

PS: I’ve held book signings and spoken in public about my writing. Public speaking has never bothered me for some reason, so I’ve found that a good way to get my name out there—and even sell a few books—is to teach workshops or lecture. I had the pleasure of speaking to the creative writing classes at Stratford (Conn.) High School this past spring. The students were incredibly polite and asked amazing questions about the entire writing process. At the end, the teacher bought several copies of An Honest Lie Vol. 2 for the school library!

ET: Nice job. How did you find Open Heart Publishing?

PS: I initially found out about Open Heart Publishing through Duotrope Digest during the call for submissions for An Honest Lie Vol. 2. OHP is wonderful in that they invite “alumni” writers to submit their work for future anthologies. Although I didn’t have a story that was a good match for An Honest Lie Vol. 3, I’m glad that my current story, “Salvage,” fit the theme of OHP’s fourth annual anthology.

ET: As someone who read and enjoyed “The Registry of Lost Socks”, I can say with some authority that readers should be excited about your forthcoming story, “Salvage”. Can you give us some insight on your writing philosophy?

PS: As the storyteller, I’m responsible for guiding the reader along the journey that is the story—be it flash fiction, a short story or a novel. In that respect, I think it’s important to tell a good story. I never really set out to convert someone, or satirize a serious topic, or even build intricate pyramids of symbolism. Really, I just want to tell a good story that I hope people enjoy.

I think it’s important to be true to yourself. A publisher can (and should) suggest edits but should never take away from the writer’s vision. I’ve turned down work from publishers who wanted to change my vision of a story to their vision of a story. Ultimately, the author has to be happy with what bears his or her byline at the end of the day.

ET: Words of wisdom from a burgeoning professional. What about deeper elements such as religion and politics?

PS: Looking back, this is a strange one for me. Politics are typically fair game in my stories, but I usually don’t touch on religion much for fear of offending or alienating certain readers. Religion is very personal and, to me at least, very private; I don’t have the right to mock or promote any one belief system over another. That having been said, I love playing with religion and archetypes in a fiction sense: creating fantasy worlds that have fictional religions, etc. One of the first novels I wrote—a fantasy that will never see the light of day, thank goodness—focused heavily on the religion of a fantasy world.

ET: We as authors walk a fine line, no doubt. You are obviously busy with writing, and need both support and space. Can you tell us how your family supports your writing goals?

PS: I’m very gracious that my family respects my writing time, which is probably the best support they can offer. When I’m at the computer writing, they know to keep quiet or refrain from asking me too many questions. The cat, however, is less sympathetic to the starving artist and will meow until his attention quota is met.

Untidiness gives me stress, so my writing area is typically neat—or else I can’t concentrate on writing. When I moved into my current house, I was able to take my childhood desk with me and remove the lofted bookshelves from the desktop. It’s now the perfect size to hold my laptop, speakers and a few other items. The desk is right next to a window, so I can gaze outside if I’m procrastinating.

ET: Outstanding. Without support, we would never be successful. Where can readers find you online?

PS: I have a personal website (patrickscalisi.com) that I update once every month (or sooner, if need be). I also have a Facebook fan page (facebook.com/patrickscalisi) that I update daily with news related to my writing, as well as interesting articles about books, the craft of writing, arts and entertainment, and more. Finally, I blog occasionally on Goodreads (http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4607795.Patrick_Scalisi) and share book recommendations, what I’m currently reading, and what I’d like to read in the future.

ET: Like a good author, sounds like you are busy writing, promoting, lecturing, writing, networking, and writing. Our readers should join me in heading over to your websites, so we can all watch you grow as a successful author. I know we’ll be seeing more of PATRICK SCALISI in the future!

I’d like to thank Patrick for allowing me to interview him, and for taking time from his busy schedule to answer my questions. Please visit his websites and show your support for this talented, dedicated author.

BIOGRAPHY

Patrick Scalisi is a journalist, magazine editor and emerging author from Connecticut. He has published fiction in several magazines, including The Willows, Neo-opsisand Twisted Dreams, among others. His short stories have also appeared in a number of fiction anthologies, including An Honest Lie Vol. 2, Shadowplay and Penny Dread Tales Vol. 1. Most recently, he served as the guest editor of the anthology The Ghost Is the Machine, released in August 2012 by Post Mortem Press. When he’s not writing, Pat enjoys watching way too many movies than are good for him, reading more books than he has shelves for and listening to music (his tastes range from classical to classic and modern rock). Visit Pat online at patrickscalisi.com or facebook.com/patrickscalisi.


Eric W. Trant is a published author of several short stories and the novel Out of the Great Black Nothing. He is currently represented by Debrin Case at Open Heart Publishing. See more of Eric’s work here: Publications

Please say Hello to Author ERIC NOTARO!

In Uncategorized on November 30, 2012 at 11:22 am

Please say Hello to published author ERIC NOTARO. He brings us his latest short story, “The Cossack’s Samovar” in Open Heart Publishing’s anthology An Honest Lie 4: Petulant Parables. Eric, can you tell us about some of your other publications?

EN: My short stories have appeared in the online journals The Four Cornered Universe and The Squawk Back. Another short story is also forthcoming in the Fall 2012 issue of Zone 3. I am busily cranking out stories as I develop a creative thesis for my Masters of Fine Art in writing at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. My hope is that I’ll have a story collection that is publishable or nearly so by that time.

ET: Outstanding! If you keep it up, you’ll have a great start on your own anthology. Can you tell us how you found An Honest Lie and Open Heart Publishing?

EN: A friend invited me to a facebook group for submitting writing for publication. I figured it’d be a good networking tool. Somewhere along the line someone else had posted a link to An Honest Lie.

ET: And yet another case for online networking, and how it can help writers. When and how did you decide to become a writer?

EN: My interest in writing really started to develop in the last few years of high school. I was one of the multitude of nerdy kids who took a stab at writing a fantasy novel and churned out about 300 pages until I realized how awful it was. Still, I’m still really jealous of my younger self’s ability to churn out content without fear of its quality. Of course, if you want to be a serious writer in any capacity you have to be aware of what you’re putting on the page and how it may be read.

ET: I’ll second that motion. I suppose if you’re serious, it means you want to be a full-time writer. What are you goals in that respect?

EN: I used to think that my ideal goal was to live off my writing alone. I still think it would be great but the more I think about it, the more I realize I’d love to be doing something that complements it on some level. On the most realistic and pragmatic level, I’d be happy with anything that allows me enough of a life outside of work so that I can write and provides some inspiration and encouragement. My program at UAF gives me the opportunity to teach while working as a grad student, so my hope is to continue on that track, but I’d love anything that engages my intelligence and imagination.

ET: I wish you the best of luck in that regards, and it sounds like you are on the right track to square up a career in writing. What is your philosophy regarding writing? Should it be fun, serious, informative, entertaining, etc.?

EN: It seems to me that writing is such a broad art form that no one can pick a handful of qualities to describe a good writer. In fact, the best writers usually do a little of everything in an organic way. George Saunders, for example, is absolutely hilarious in many of his stories and yet the human struggles and failings of his characters against his depiction of a cartoonishly cruel society still comes out genuine. Of course, some writers might have a few dominant qualities and still shine through. Cormac McCarthy is downright dark to the point of nihilism but is still hard to put down.
The best writing, whether it be mine or anyone else’s, is consistent and honest to what is being written. Humor is a powerful thing but can backfire if all the reader is doing is laughing and nothing else. A traumatic moment can shake the reader but is useless if all it’s doing is creating that reaction for reaction’s sake. The written word is reflective and contemplative in nature. Anything that strengthens that nature is doing something right.

ET: Wow, sounds like you could have an MFA in Writing from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks! How about when you write and create? Do you write to music or other background noise? If so, what sort? If not, how do you find your quietude?

EN: I prefer a quiet experience. Music can be too distracting to me and when I am writing with music on, it’s because I’m able to tune it out. The extremes of the day tend to be my time: early morning or late at night which can be hard living up in a place like Fairbanks since one portion of the year is perpetual daylight and the other is 20 hours of night. Still, if I can get myself to my desk, keep facebook closed and have an idea of what I want to work with I can get something through.

ET: Ah, the quiet writer. I share your view on quiet writing spots, but they are rare times. Do you plot your stories, or write as you go?

EN: Usually, It’s a matter of finding some concept or opening scene to work from. After that, as long as I have a vague sense where I want to take it I let the story find itself. I’m also obsessive about revising as I go which is an issue if you’re just trying to get a draft down, but I try to ensure that the first typed draft is as good as possible. Recently, I’ve been handwriting at least some of the drafts and transcribing on the page, editing as I do so. It’s mixed results so far. Sometimes I’m not satisfied with how it’s going but other days I get a few pages before I even start typing.

ET: A fellow pantser, as they’re called. I share many of your views on writing, and if I’m ever in Alaska or you’re ever in Texas, it would be nice to sit and talk writing. Until then, I’ll say THANK YOU for sharing your thoughts, and we all look forward to seeing your latest story, “The Cossack’s Somnovar”, in An Honest Lie 4: Petulant Parables, from Open Heart Publishing.

– Eric Trant


BIO: Eric Notaro was born in upstate New York, attended Chester College of New England in southern New Hampshire, and is working on an MFA in writing at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He has worked as a charity canvasser on the streets of Boston and as a bookstore clerk in interior Alaska. He is a Graduate Teaching assistant leading a course on introductory composition at UAF.

Eric’s stories include “Ghost,” published in The Four Cornered Universe and “The Stars, and Other Crap” published in Squawk Back. His forthcoming works are “The Nomad” in the Fall 2012 issue of Zone 3 and “The Cossack’s Samovar” in the anthology An Honest Lie 4: Petulant Parables.


Eric W. Trant is a published author of several short stories and the novel Out of the Great Black Nothing. He is currently represented by Debrin Case at Open Heart Publishing. See more of Eric’s work here: Publications